A NEW SQUARE FOR LONDON
A NEW SQUARE FOR LONDON

A NEW SQUARE FOR LONDON

West Hampstead Square passes one of the key tests of good urban planning: Creating a sense of place reflective of the neighbourhood it inhabits. 

Londoners are rightly proud of their squares. They offer a breathing space in the midst of a busy day, a place to meet friends and relax, a focal point for a thriving, active community.

West End Lane is a well-established, village-like community, teeming with coffee shops, restaurants and independent retailers. But until now, it has lacked a central focus, a point of arrival and departure, a place to meet or just to sit and watch.

West Hampstead SQ fulfils that role to perfection. The addition of a new, leafy public square at the very heart of the area transforms West End Lane. Here, you’ll be able to sit and watch the world go by and there’s plenty of space for a Farmer’s Market and other community activities to take place.

The design is inspired by the linear patterns of the rail lines at West Hampstead stations and mixes the idea of modern urban connections with a more traditional clock tower – a new landmark for the village.

FACT

In 1964, The Rolling Stones manager discovered that arch-rivals the Beatles were making more money composing their own songs. He allegedly locked the Stones in the kitchen of their West Hampstead flat until they had written their next hit, ‘Tell Me’. 

Source: Channel 4

Thomas Bate, a local estate agent and property developer, wrote to the Metropolitan Railway to suggest that their new station, opened in 1879, should be called West Hampstead rather than West End Lane. 

Source: Kilburn and West Hampstead Past, by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms

West Hampstead Town Hall, in Broadhurst Gardens, was established in 1886. By 1929 it had become a recording studio and later was owned by Decca. It is now home to the English National Opera. 

Source: Kilburn and West Hampstead Past, by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms

COOL, CALM & CONNECTED

COOL, CALM & CONNECTED

West Hampstead's stations make the daily commute so simple - whether it be for work or play. And if getting to work in the West End, the City or Canary Wharf is easy, so too is getting away, with great connections to international travel hubs such as St Pancras and Gatwick within easy reach.

But this typically English corner of London has a lot more to recommend it; you could spend a lifetime exploring, without ever retracing your steps.

London’s Jubilee Line, Overground and Thameslink networks are right on your doorstep, with services to St Pancras for Eurostar (7 mins), Westminster (14 mins), West End (15 mins), Bank (25 mins), Canary Wharf (25 mins) and airports Heathrow (35 mins), City (40 mins), Gatwick (55 mins) and Stansted (1hr 20mins).

VIEW MAP OF TRANSPORT
THE LIVING IS EASY
/5

THE LIVING IS EASY

There’s no doubt about West Hampstead: it has a feel-good quality about it. For over a hundred years, a thriving colony of artists, designers, scientists and academics have found themselves a home in this part of London.

While Hampstead Village itself is very much a senior citizen of London, a sort of elder statesman, West Hampstead is more like an up-and-coming younger generation, with a distinct character and an energy of its own.

West Hampstead SQ sits very nicely in that frame, ideally suited to young professionals and growing families who like the idea of settling in the centre of an established community, but who also want to enjoy a quality of life and a standard of living that only comes with a well-connected, twenty-first century place like this.

There’s no shortage of things to see and do, whatever your passion. Lovers of the great outdoors, good food and wines, the arts and museums will have no trouble filling the days. It’s easy to understand why a new home here will be much sought after.

FACT

There are pleasures to be had discovering the names of West Hampstead streets, ranging romantically from Gascony to Parsifal, from Agamemnon to Narcissus and, surprisingly, from Skardu to Weech.

Source: The Streets of West Hampstead, by Camden History Society’s Street History Group

In 1962, The Beatles auditioned at the Decca studios on Broadhurst Gardens. The session didn’t go well and resulted in the now famous rejection: “The Beatles have no future in show business”.

Source: The Streets of West Hampstead, by Camden History Society’s Street History Group

West Hampstead was so peaceful that the striking of Big Ben could be heard; indeed, the owners of West End Hall were sure that they’d heard the sounds of the cannon at Waterloo in 1815.

Source: The Streets of West Hampstead, by Camden History Society’s Street History Group

EXPLORE LOCATION
View: West Hampstead Location
  • Restaurant / Cafe
  • Parks
  • Sports
  • Museums / Galleries
  • Bar / Pub
  • Shopping
  • Public Transport
CLOSE